Carpets can add a touch of class and finesse to any room or home. They are also a contrast between the plush and softness of carpeting with the hard floor. However, carpets have one major flaw: stains.

Carpet stains can be a challenge. New stains might end up spreading, becoming a bigger problem if you aren’t sure how to minimise things. An old stain will end up having roots in the fibres, requiring that it be broken down before cleaning can begin in earnest.

The use of carpet shampoo is a pretty traditional method. There are numerous brands, and some of these are best suited for particular types of rugs. If you plan on using these, here are a few key reminders.

  • Don’t skimp on the shampoo. Use exactly as much of the product as needed to cover the area of the carpeting.
  • Don’t make the carpet too wet. This wastes detergent and makes it take longer to dry out. You don’t even get any real benefit out of it.
  • Follow instructions.
  • Use a hard-bristled brush for stubborn areas, like where old stains linger.

Your kitchen cupboard might also have secrets for cleaning carpets. In particular, baking soda and tonic water excel at getting rid of coffee stains. Salt can help remove dirt or soak up fresh stains. Baking soda can help get rid of odors that linger in the fibers after cleaning.

There are also powder carpet cleaners.

The use of cleaning powders can be great. They have the benefit of not needing to be dried out, but there are some instances when it isn’t the most convenient option.

When using a powder, you’ll want to sprinkle freely. Cover the entire carpet, with a slight focus on the area with the stain. Leaving the powder to rest for half an hour is good, but letting it linger overnight is the best course of action.

You want to give the cleaning agents time to work. The longer the powder rests, the softer the stains become and the more odors it consumes. Vacuum up when you’re done.

Finally, if all of these sound like too much of a hassle – or if you find yourself dealing with especially challenging stains – call a professional.